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iCream Cafe Delights Frisco with Liquid Nitrogen Treats

Green tea and hazelnut ice cream made from liquid nitrogen (photography by Carol Shih)
Green tea and hazelnut ice cream made from liquid nitrogen (photography by Carol Shih)

Heidi Ackerman was watching the Food Network’s Kid in a Candy Store when she saw owner Cora Shaw explain how iCream Cafe was born out of a grad school project.

The original iCream Cafe, which is located in Chicago, uses liquid nitrogen machines to make ice cream, frozen yogurt, sorbet, and hot pudding right before each customer’s eyes. It’s a very customizable process that kids and families love to watch. In short, it feels like a high-tech food lab where cool science projects take place.

Ackerman called Shaw and asked about franchising after she finished watching the video. “I love that you can come in, watch it being made, and get exactly what you want. And the liquid nitrogen is cool,” she says.

Now, after a lot of hard work, Ackerman is opening the first iCream Cafe store in Texas at 9250 Dallas Parkway, Suite 150. (It’s right off the Dallas North Tollway in Frisco.) The grand opening is slated for tomorrow, October 5.

The liquid nitrogen machine (left); raspberry lemon sorbet with a blackberry and white chocolate chips on top (right)
The liquid nitrogen machine (left); raspberry lemon sorbet with a blackberry and white chocolate chips on top (right)
Owner Heidi Ackerman and the cool liquid nitro effect.
Owner Heidi Ackerman and the cool liquid nitro effect.

The former Frisco ISD employee who worked in child nutrition is very conscientious of her little guests’ needs, and she wants to make sure all kids with allergies are given special care. She’ll sanitize any of the instruments used to make the child’s dessert and wear gloves while she’s making it. There’s also soy milk, coconut milk, and non-dairy-based sorbets for those people with lactose intolerance. And if you don’t want your ice cream too sugary, just ask.

But that shouldn’t be too much of a problem, anyway. At iCream Cafe, the green tea and hazelnut ice cream combination that I requested had an icier (as opposed to creamier) consistency, and it was surprisingly not sugary. I ate a couple bites, planned to put it down, but couldn’t help myself to a few more. This is the kind of ice cream you could eat without feeling bad about it.

Red velvet + cake hot pudding with chocolate chips and cream cheese toppings.
Red velvet + cake hot pudding with chocolate chips and cream cheese toppings.

 

There are about 28 flavors to choose from, and you can combine them however you want. Classic flavors include strawberry, pistachio, vanilla bean. Notable ones consist of curry, ginger, toasted marshmallow, and green tea. After you choose your flavor(s), Ackerman will make the ice cream using her liquid nitrogen machine, and then you pick your mix-ins and toppings.

If you don’t want ice cream, you can also get hot pudding. Choose any of the 28 flavors to make a pudding-like dessert that’s made from an espresso machine. It’s perfect for the coming winter months. Add toppings as you like. For Ackerman, this is her favorite item at the shop.

7 comments on “iCream Cafe Delights Frisco with Liquid Nitrogen Treats

  1. Nope. Ice cream, shake, froyo, sorbet, and hot pudding prices: small is $3.99, medium is $4.99, and large is $6.49.

  2. Wish you all the best in your venture, Heidi! We love the iCream in Chicago!

  3. Tried this, and it is great! Tried Apple Pi with cinnamon ice cream, one of their specialties, as well as my own mixing of banana and white chocolate with almonds. Both were yummy!! Congratulations Heidi, on another first for Frisco!

  4. Went there on day 2 (Sun afternoon) of opening. Expected a lot of fan fare and lines given the free publicity they scored with local TV (WFAA 8), but it’s was fairly quite and subdued. No promotions, no samples, no greeter to explain the process. In the news story, it was touted as “make your own ice cream”, but you actually just order everything like any other ice cream shop, nothing hands-on (it was a bit like Marble Slab). You’re actually a bit worse off because you don’t get to SEE the ice cream cream and only have to pick by the flavor names. The price was in-line with the premium brands ($3.99 for small + $1 for each size up). You can choose up to 2 flavors and toppings, but they mix them all up, so it defeats the whole purpose of trying different flavors! I also didn’t care for the funny creamy after-taste. To be fair, my wife who came with no expectations, enjoyed her PBOMG (Vanilla with Peanut Butter and Graham Crackers) just fine, and it’s kinda cool to see the liquid nitrogen pour into the mixer to freeze the ice cream, hence a generous 3 stars. Bottom line, not impressed, don’t think we’ll be coming back. We’ll stick to Paciugo and the Asian yogurt places, where our kids love picking their own toppings, and are also a better value and taste.