The Hospitality Sweet Opens in Downtown Dallas on Monday

Cappuccino (left); cake balls  are sold for $15 per dozen or $20 per dozen if they're individually wrapped (right)
Cappuccino (left); cake balls are sold for $15 per dozen or $20 per dozen if they’re individually wrapped (right)

Man, if I could marry Meghan Adams’ strata, I would. The first time I ate that breakfast egg strata with brie, bell peppers, and potatoes, I had three whole helpings . We were at a D Academy class day, and I barely listened to the speakers that morning because I was so focused on all the food Adams was providing for us. (The strata, in particular.)

I’m excited (giddy, really) to announce that The Hospitality Sweet, Meghan Adams’ storefront, is opening inside the historic Post Office at 400 N. Ervay St. on Monday. Most of you who don’t live or work downtown probably don’t know the dearth of good, inexpensive food we have in this section of the city. If you want a quick, cheap meal, you’re forced to go into the tunnels for junky stuff like Kuai Dumplings. But now, downtown workers, you can say, “Screw the tunnels! I’m going to The Hospitality Sweet.”

Kevin the barista and Meghan Adams
Kevin the barista and cute-as-cake pops Meghan Adams
Brisket sandwich with orzo and fruit covered in Romanoff sauce
Brisket sandwich with orzo and fruit covered in Romanoff sauce

A quick word about Meghan Adams’ background: She grew up in Lake Highlands and that’s where she still lives right now. First she attended Baylor, then transferred to American University because she wanted to do broadcast journalism. Thank goodness (on behalf of my stomach) that didn’t work out. “I always really liked baking and my grandma baked a lot,” she says. “I took a cake class and loved the idea of having a bakery. It was something that sounded like a neat idea, but I didn’t know if it was going to happen.”

Adams started small. She made casseroles for people, she catered baby showers, and made wedding cakes. As her skills grew, so did her desire to open a store. Timothy Oulton, a vintage furniture designer store, is where she opened her first space, but it’s not somewhere people can sit down for a meal. Customers can pick up sweets and boxed lunches and look at furniture while they’re waiting. That’s about it.

The Hospitality Sweet inside the historic Post Office is itty bitty, but Adams plans to put extra tables outside of her bakery for more seating possibilities. My friend Lesley, who y’all know as the Happy Hostess, went with me and said Adams “had good taste.” Everything inside the bakery was pastel-colored and exuded the same kind of personal warmth as Adams. She also did a business-savvy move by hiring a barista, Kevin, who previously worked at Crooked Tree Coffeehouse, so the coffee program is solid. Very solid. “He knows everything about everything,” says Adams. “He is a gem to find.”

The Hospitality Sweet serves breakfast and lunch from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. Adams hopes to open on the weekends, too, once business gets rolling. (Downtown residents really need a coffee/breakfast place open on weekends. There’s only one option these days: Starbucks.) You can pick up pre-made salads and sandwiches, or hot ones right off the presser. Everything is tasty and priced at $9 or less. The sweets include cake pops, drop cookies, turtle brownies, macarons, and a delightful humming bird cupcake. It’s banana, pineapple, nutmeg, cinnamon, and cream cheese frosting. I tried one, and it definitely won’t be my last.

11 comments on “The Hospitality Sweet Opens in Downtown Dallas on Monday

  1. I’m glad to see this new opening. However, as a downtown worker who frequents all restaurants in the tunnel, I take issue with your unnecessary jab directly at Kuai Dumplings. Given the options available, it’s one of the better choices and is certainly not “junky” food.

  2. I absolutely agree. I was pretty offended too. That is a great place and there are also many others in the tunnels… Zaguan (Venezuelan food), Noodle Nexus (multi-ethnic noodle place), Subway, Quizno’s, Sonny Bryan’s (You’ve heard of them right?) a couple of Mexican places, a home cooking place, a Mediterranean place as well as a few fast food places. And above ground near the Post Office, Jus Mex (fantastic Mexican food), Original Italian Cafe, Tootsie’s, Subway Mad Hatter Cafe etc. While it’s great to promote a new place, it’s a pretty low blow to discount all the existing places that serve downtown Dallas.

  3. I’m with the others on this – I am thrilled to have a new option, but dang…you don’t have to bust on Kuai. Their dumplings are tasty, the soup is good and the staff is always super friendly.

  4. OMG!! I just stopped in while I was at the Post Office. Grabbed a Red Velvet cupcake (got one for me and another to share), they are AWESWOME!! Can’t wait to have lunch there.

  5. As a downtown resident… please stay open in the weekend!! Just for breakfast would be a good start.

  6. I think the big issue here is that of the places you listed, TxGIrl1924, only Subway and Mad Hatter are open on the weekends and after 3 p.m. It’s great to have new businesses brave enough to try the streets of downtown Dallas rather than those wretched tunnels. I wish all those businesses in the tunnels would move up and open up for residents.

  7. I agree with you wholeheartedly; the jab at Kuai, of all places, is a little far fetched and added nothing to this story.

  8. I am glad there is a capitalist brave enough to open a new venture in today’s marketplace. I don’t agree with the writer’s point of view on being “forced” to go to the tunnel – there is plenty of variety of eating choices within 5-10 minutes of the old post office to go eat above ground. Whether you choose to go or not, well, that’s up to you.

    Let me share the experience of my collegue who ordered a caramel macchiato and a chocolate chip cookie at the Hospitality Sweet. The cookie was hard, but the chocolate melted in her mouth. The macchiato, sans caramel (they were out) came in something the size. of. a. Dixie. cup. I almost forgot to add, the pretty heart was shaped into the foam.

    Now, i don’t know about you. but in these economic times (pretty much all the time) I like to at least feel as if I get value for my money. Somehow, $3.50 for maybe 3-4 ounces of coffee with pretty foam on top is not my idea of value. I don’t care how good it tastes. Unless some hunkadoodle is bringing it to me on a tray in bed with satin sheets, then you can bet I won’t be getting all worked up and going over there for coffee. Or the hard cookies.

  9. I work across the street in Patriot Plaza (soon to be One Dallas Center) and disagree with the writer’s comments about places to eat. Sometimes the desire to be cute and entertaining does an injustice. In this section of downtown there’re a number of places for an excellent and affordable lunch or snack. I eat out every day for lunch and I’m never at a loss for somewhere good. That said, I do think the Hospitality Sweet is an excellent addition and I agree with what others have said, the sweets are excellent and the coffee perhaps the best around, strong but not bitter like the big national chain. My only complaints are the place is a little illogically laid out and needs area away from the cash register for preparing coffee. I also think their prices are a little higher than surrounding prices which could hurt. The owner and her family are charming and when they are there the place takes on warmth that is not there when they are not. I like the place and will place it on my breakfast and lunch rotation.

  10. I work across the street in Patriot Plaza (soon to be One Dallas center) and disagree with the writer’s comments about places to eat in this area of downtown. Sometimes the desire to be cute and entertaining does an injustice. In this section of downtown there’re a number of places for an excellent and affordable lunch or snack. I eat out every day for lunch and I’m never at a loss for somewhere good. That said, I do think the Hospitality Sweet is an excellent addition and I agree with what others have said, the sweets are excellent and the coffee perhaps the best around, strong but not bitter like the big national chain. My only complaints are the place is a little illogically laid out and needs area away from the cash register for preparing coffee. I also think prices are a little higher than surrounding prices, which could hurt. The owner and her family are charming and when they’re there the place takes on warmth that’s not there when they are not. I like the place and will place it on breakfast and lunch rotation.

  11. @Milly, a macchiato is only supposed to be ~3oz (2oz espresso and a very small amount of milk foam) and it typically should not include caramel. It sounds like you may be comparing the drink you got at HS to a Starbucks caramel macchiato. The Starbucks version isn’t really a macchiato and unfortunately leads to a lot of confusion. That being said, you did get your money’s worth. You still had 2oz’s of the good stuff sans an additional 8oz’s of milk.