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Craft Dallas and Ghostbar are on Their Way Out. Cook Hall is Opening in the Fall

Todd Johnson is very upset. It turns out that Craft Dallas - Tom Colicchio’s non-gimmicky restaurant in the W Hotel where Nancy once said she’d pick its chicken dish for her last supper – is closing at the end of this summer to make room for a new restaurant, Cook Hall, that’ll open as early as the fall. Cook Hall is supposed to be a modern take on America’s gastropub and will offer “regional cuisine and handcrafted cocktails…The restaurant will add a new bar and flow more openly into the hotel’s Living Room (W’s take on the traditional hotel lobby) as well as offer shareable small-plates to encourage the social experience. Cook Hall’s pricing will be moderate to upscale.”

This is new direction is headed by Culinary Concepts Hospitality Group (CCHG), and Craft Dallas isn’t the only W destination it’s giving the axe. Ghostbar, the hotel’s 33rd floor nightclub, is also closing later this month. Plans for the space are still being finalized at the moment. Meanwhile, everyone should head to the W and start saying their last goodbyes. First Nana, now Craft Dallas. Is big-league fine dining dying a slow, inevitable death in Dallas? Sure looks like it.

14 comments on “Craft Dallas and Ghostbar are on Their Way Out. Cook Hall is Opening in the Fall

  1. Did ANYONE think this all through before attempting to build and promote this area…really???

  2. I like the ideas. Craft was so hidden and tucked away in the hotel that it always seemed like an after thought. Plus it was expensive, so other area dining options always would trump dining at Craft. Opening up that area of the hotel lobby with tables and a second bar is a great idea so long as they remove that wall that separates the restaurant and the Living Room bar. Nobody goes to Ghostbar anymore. Upstairs in that space is where they need their fine dining concept. And maybe more of a casual lounge than a club. They may then be able to sell some of those vacant condo units once the club noise is diminished.

  3. “modern take on America’s Gastropub”
    Really? Seriously? What’s next? Creme Brûlée back on the menu?

  4. Not the Ghost Bar! Where will Ed Hardy-wearing Eurotrash men be able to mingle with off-duty strippers? (Other than strip clubs.)

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  6. When will the Victory Park area recognize that the clientele coming to Stars and Mavs games are not entirely millionaires? Open some bars and restaurants that are fun for the general public so we can all have a good time without being on the guest list or wearing a suit.

  7. Whomever they paid to do the marketing research and building permits for VP needs to just fork it on over in this direction. I am not an architect, an urban designer, a hotelier, or even remotely involved in the hospitality business, but I lived in Jefferson while they were building VP. I was 25 at the time an could have told you then “THEY’RE DOING IT WRONG!” Who builds a complex like that, in Dallas, with no through street? IT’S FACING THE WRONG WAY PEOPLE! At least the Hard Rock and the HOB figured it out. The House? Not so much. People in Dallas have to see and be seen. People park and walk down Houston Street. DUH! I feel so bad for poor Kenichi and all of the other places in VP and the Brewery that have come and gone because there is no foot traffic to lure people into their very fine establishments. Oh, and I’m pretty sure the investors were promised gambling when they broke ground (re: “We want it to be a mixture between Las Vegas and Times Square”), but until ol’ Perry is ousted, they will be screwed. Trust me, Jerry already has the blueprints drawn up for his casino is Arlington.

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  9. Dallas is a city of roving nightspots. Once it was Deep Ellum, then the West End, and Victory tried to pick up the torch (Henderson is having a run at it now, but is it sustainable?). However, once hype dies and newness wears off, an entertainment district loses its lustre and attraction. The area is made for cars and not for people to use 24/7, despite the Katy Trail dumping people onto its doorstep. It is poorly designed, inherently classist, and fails to keep people in the neighborhood once they get there.

  10. I think this is great news. Craft never had any heart or soul and was too expensive. Ghostbar added nothing to Dallas and the crowd it attracted was not consistent with the rest of Victory and uptown. i think Victory is finally going the right direction and I hear they are working on making other changes to fix what’s broken. TR