Central Market Hosts “Lunch in Paris” with Elizabeth Seitz

Market (left); Chocolate caramel pot de crème (right) photos by Becca Brooks

Our spring intern Becca Brooks attended a delightful Central Market lunch as an invited guest on Friday. She files this report.

I had lunch in Paris today. I couldn’t see the Eiffel Tower or smell fresh macarons from the boulangerie, but Central Market gave me the French fix I’ve been longing for.

If you haven’t stopped at Central Market this month, you are truly missing out. They’ve turned the entire place into a Parisian market. From now until May 22, Central Market is themed “Passport France.” The only thing cheesy about it is the fromagerie, which is now home to hundreds of authentic French cheeses. The employees wear French berets and welcome you with a warm “Bonjour!’

Jump for more France.

Central Market (left); Chicken with morel mushrooms with spears of asparagus (right)

The Cooking School at the Lovers Lane Central Market was packed. I snagged the last seat in the room. About 40 women attended, and unless you count a chef and a waiter, there were no men at all.

Elizabeth New Seitz, founder of French Affaires and self-confessed Francophile, led a casual presentation celebrating French cuisine and culture while the rest of us died and went to heaven. First, we were served a plat de charcuterie, which included a delicious wild boar pate with chestnuts. I am relatively new to French food and the idea of Foie gras de canard, but the duck liver was my favorite part of the plate.

Jim and Diana (left); flowers (right)

Next, we had a traditional green salad with vinaigrette, which is always a good idea. For the main entrée, the chefs served chicken with morel mushrooms and spears of asparagus. Everyone’s favorite part was dessert, of course. Instead of a traditional soufflé or macaroon, the chef made a chocolate caramel pot de crème, which dramatically improved my quality of life. The custard was served in a 4-ounce ramekin, the perfect size for my full belly.

You still have the rest of the month to experience Passport France wine seminars and cooking classes. The full schedule can be found here.

4 comments on “Central Market Hosts “Lunch in Paris” with Elizabeth Seitz

  1. It’s actually spelled macaron. There’s a difference between a macaroon and a macaron.

  2. Why is there a debate? The French ‘macaron’ is the perfect almond flour/egg white sandwich cookie with buttercream or ganache. The American ‘macaroon’ is the dense/sweet/coconut/toasted top thing. They are two totally different creations. Anyone calling the French ‘macaron’ a macaroon is just wrong, and vice-versa.