Mark Bittman Promotes Food Consciousness, Thinks Soda Should be Taxed

Bittman, the Batman of Food Policy (photo by Carol Shih)

If you’ve read Mark Bittman’s book, Food Matters, and his column on The New York Times, you’re probably familiar with his effortless ability to weave in food policy, politics, and the way we eat within a single sentence. Last night, Bittman (aka the Batman of Food Policy) spoke to a large crowd at the Temple Emanu-El about the importance of eating right and being food conscious.

“The only aspect of food that you can discuss now without bringing in everything else is how much fun it is to eat. And even that is become tainted. You can barely talk about the garden or the supermarket or the food on your table without talking about the failure of government, the dominance of corporations, and the breakdown of food security. Food engages everything.”

Bittman used soda, his idea of the 21st century’s tobacco, as an example of how the government isn’t doing the best job to protect its people.

(Jump for the six minute video that took me the whole day to upload because I am an idiot…)

“Soda is food’s opposite. It’s empty nourishment…Some say taxing soda – or prohibiting its use with food stamps – is a slippery slope, one that will lead to defining which foods are nutritious and which aren’t, and which government funds should we subsidize and which shouldn’t. The basic point is this: we should subsidize foods that we should encourage people to eat, we think are right for people to eat, and we should be disincentivizing those that we don’t.”

Most importantly, food matters on a personal level. “If we can’t get soda taxed, eliminate government subsidies, fix school lunches, help poor people eat well, we can still set an example – you and I – by eating a plant-heavy diet.” Bittman encouraged his Dallas audience to shift its diet to more fruits and vegetables, and to contribute – a little at a time – to the growing need for changes to our food policies.

5 comments on “Mark Bittman Promotes Food Consciousness, Thinks Soda Should be Taxed

  1. Thank you for this report. I wish I’d known about this guy before last night as I would have enjoyed seeing it. The video is very interesting. Nice report

  2. it was a great speech and WELL ATTENDED – good job dallas.

    i’m not a food nazi and i’m not for a militant food revolution. but it was hard to walk out of there and NOT change the basic idea of how we strive to eat.

    emphasis on “strive”…he was very clear that he isn’t pushing for a nation of vegans. what he is pushing for is a nation of people who stop getting 10% of their nutrition of from fruits and veg and 90% from everything else. it should be the other way around according to him.

    are any of us in the shape we want to be in? do we exercise as much as we want? no. but that doesn’t meant to stop. it means do what you can. 2 days a week. 3 on a good week. and take that attitude to eating better.

    so simple, but made so much sense.

    and PS he wrote the best fish cooking article EVER.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/03/magazine/mag-03Eat-t.html?_r=1&src=me&ref=homepage

  3. Take away the government subsidies on high fructose corn sugars and the like while also doing away with the cane sugar import limits. Let the free market do what it is supposed to do, creating a higher priced product without having to resort to a “tax” on an industry that is government subsidized. And I only drink diet soda.

  4. Diet soda is toxic. Studies have shown that if you drink it regularly, you’re more likely to be obese. It increases your risk of stroke and heart attack, and its assortment of chemicals and fake sweeteners is not good for your liver or intestines.

    Pretty sure that Bittman’s point was to not drink soda AT ALL

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