Pouting Over Poutine

Poutine from the Greenhouse Tavern, Cleveland OH (photo from Columbus Underground @ www.columbusunderground.com)

A couple of weeks ago I gushed about my love for the burgers at Kenny’s Burger Joint.  One of our Sidedishers, “Kirk,” commented that they offered “the closest facsimile of poutine in the DFW area.”  When I heard this, it was not long until I found my way back to sample the Kenny’s version.  As you likely know, “poutine” is a classic Canadian dish, traditionally composed of crispy French fries, cheese curds, and a brown gravy.  The most successful variations of poutine are able to serve the fries thick and crisp, the cheese curd soft but not so completely melted that they lose all their texture, and the gravy incorporated into each bite, but not so much as to turn the whole thing into a soup or make the fries overly soggy.  However, this dish is incredibly hard to find in Dallas.  I don’t understand why this is so.  Perhaps it’s our distance from our neighbors to the North? Perhaps there are not enough Canadians here in the Lone Star State?  It really is a travesty.

Kenny's version of "poutine"

Kenny’s version was tasty but had some flaws compared to the more traditional Canadian versions. It was very heavy on the gravy, which left the otherwise exceptional fries a bit too soggy.  The melted Jarlsberg cheese was rather scant and lacked the textural chew that comes from a good cheese curd.  One of the more memorable American variations can be found at the Greenhouse Tavern in Cleveland, OH which serves duck fat fries, mozzarella curd and veal gravy.  However, there seems to be nothing like this in the Dallas area.

What gives, Dallas restauranteurs?  This is a dish I think Dallas would truly embrace.  Even a poutine food truck could work.  Anyone know where this delectable dish may be found in Big D?

14 comments on “Pouting Over Poutine

  1. I have yet to find good cottage cheese (which is basically cheese curds) down here as well. Used to buy the Michigan Brand CC up in the north, it was drier, no milk soup with the cottage cheese. You could upturn the tub and nothing would run out. Delicious.

  2. A place called Vercelli’s in Krum, TX just NW of Denton served a good version, but they shut down late last year. Stackhouse Burgers had poutine printed on an early Press Release menu, but I’ve yet to see it on their actual menu.

  3. A spicy gravy and gruyere cover the crispy fries at Holy Grail pub. They’re certainly enjoyable, but not poutine (they don’t even use the term on their menu).

  4. Amy y El Brad, doesn’t Paula Lambert sell cottage cheese? Also saw poutine at Stackhouse Burgers. BTW, (some rural) Canadian restaurants serve french fries instead of rice with Chinese food.

  5. Stackhouse was going to do poutine but we had trouble finding fresh curds that “squeak”. We have made it special for some of our regulars that are from up north and they all agree that the curds here are just not the same. If somebody out there knows a supplier give us a shout, we will start making it a a special and see where it goes!

  6. Daniel: I wouldn’t have tried anything that looked like the mess you photographed at Kenny’s. Maybe you should ask them to go lighter on the gravy next time, and melt the cheese over the top of the dish. I’ve asked them to skip the cheese on a couple of occasions.

  7. While it may be delicious Oddfellows does NOT have poutine. No cheese curds –> not poutine. They can call it whatever they want, but it’s not poutine.

    Fact is, I’ve checked and NOBODY has poutine in the dee eff dub. They can’t source the curds.

  8. @Randy If you make it, they will come. There are plenty of Canadians in Dallas. BTW, just had Stackhouse for the first time on Friday. Great burgers, love the atmosphere of the place.

  9. The Common Table is debuting true Poutin tonight. Scardello Cheese helped source the Curds so it’s legit.