16 comments on “2009 KRLD Restaurant Week: Reader Reviews

  1. Fearing’s, Friday, 8/21: We had an 8:45 dinner reservation and were seated immediately. The waiter was very attentive and friendly but not in the I-just-escaped-TGI Friday’s-training-let’s-be-best-friends kind of way. The tortilla soup was tasty but lukewarm even after it was just poured – I would have preferred it to be piping hot, but that’s just me. The waiter asked for our dinner order before our drinks even arrived. The food was phenomenal overall, but we got the feeling the entire staff was trying to turn our table as quickly as possible. We had a bottle of wine and ordered an entree off the non-RW menu, so we were disappointed that the staff wanted to give us the boot so quickly. While the standard table visit from Dean was appreciated, he gave the same audible “How is everything? Glad you’re here. If there’s anything I can do for you, you let me know” to every table. Kind of loses its luster, ya know? Anyway, I’ll definitely be back to Fearing’s but maybe not for RW…

  2. Went to Al Biernat’s Sunday and it was great. Had a 7:30 reservation and was seated immediately. Didn’t feel rushed and had a great meal. This was my first try at restaurant week and I’m a big fan now. I might try to head somewhere next week.

  3. Beth, I’m with you, but what really annoys me is when the a waitstaff memeber walks up and says, “How’s everthin’ tastin?”

    Like fingernails on a chalkboard.

  4. Steve Fields last night and other than it being a hopping place for Cougars over 65 looking for a hot date, it was REALLY good. Best menu I have seen. The crab cakes were the best I have had in a long while, like crab legs without the work. And our waiter was the nicest and friendliest guy…we actually wondered if we could get whatever pill he was taking…he had a smile on his face the entire time. Will try another night for sure.

  5. @Jane
    What would you prefer the servers to say?

    Servers can’t win, it seems. Criticized for doing their job. Sheesh.

  6. @Bad_Ike
    I wait tables and I understand what Jane’s saying. “How’s everthin’ tastin?” is too generic and insincere.
    A more appropriate approach is to specify an entree, “Are you enjoying the salmon?”; “How is the tenderloin?”
    This way you can single out a guest and not make your words seem as robotic.

  7. I was a little underwhelmed by Five Sixty. First RW experience that I actually felt rushed. Maybe it’s because they started serving the wine before I even started my cocktail. A lot of wine, though. That was a bonus. Food was fine.

    I’m hoping for a better experience tomorrow at The French Room.

  8. @Beth

    Would you prefer Dean not come to the table at all? I know it seems to be repetitive sometimes, but for people who aren’t able to go to Fearing’s on a weekly basis, it means a lot when the chef (especially a chef as warm, friendly, and “celebrity-ish” as Dean) comes over to say hello. In fact, most reviews I read about Fearing’s specifically mention how the Chef came to their table and made them feel very special during their dinner. It may lose its luster for you, but I will continue to enjoy it.

  9. @hungry

    Thanks for the sincere and earnest but rather unsatisfying answer.

    What’s a non-intrusive way to ask if anyone at a table bigger than a two-, or at most, four-top? “How is your steak? and your halibut? and your chef’s special? your roast chicken? and your bouillabaisse? and your leg of lamb? and your fajitas? and your salad? All good, yes? Now let me ask about those sides…We’ll do this again at the next course.”

  10. @Bad Ike

    I really don’y think there’s a need to ask evry one at every table how their individual dish is, just as I think its unnecessary to ask an entire group (more than 4) how everything is

    Chances are if there is one person in a large group that isn’t satisfied with their meal, they won’t speak up anyway out of fear of calling attention to themselves. You’ll be able to tell when they’ve hardly touched their plate. Then you can quietly go and ask if they’d prefer another dish or perhaps be able to rectify the initial dish. That way you’re being unobtrusive and paying attention.

  11. Ike: Alternative for asking if ‘everthin’ is tastin good’:

    Say nothing. If they do not like the meal, they will speak up. I learned this the hard way. My first waitress job was at a Italian place in the Colorado mountains. The hunters would come up from Texas and Oklahoma and literally fed my ego with their flirting compliments and large tips(I also met my 1st ex-husband there, he left me a $100 bill as a tip- believe me honey, that was the LAST $100 bill I ever got out of him, but I digress) so then I meet this husband and I run away to Florida with him(I broke my mother’s heart) so, here I am at a Bennigan’s waitressing and Judd Nelson(BREAKFAST CLUB) walks in with two blondes. I still think I’m hot stuff, ya know? Because of all of those hunters telling me how great I am? And the table literally treats me like dirt. I ask them, how’s everythin’ tastin’? And nobody answers. Crickets, Tree Frogs, Tumbleweeds… I never asked that question again.

    Ike: Now that my second husband is a chef, we discuss this frequently. If you want to make small talk with your table, remark that a certain dish they are eating is your favorite, or like Hungry stated, ask directly about a side, or a main course- but your job is to make the table happy and satisfied. We have the utmost respect for waitstaff, but if you look, act, sound, bored, your table will know it.

  12. It was soooooooo wrong…it only took me a few minutes to discover why it was so very dark in the bar. AND the lady in the corner with most of her red bra showing…oh I could go on. But it really was great food and who doesn’t love good train wreck watching?

  13. I prefer the waitperson not to start with “My name is________. It crosses a boundary. It also reeks of Brinker Culture.

    I think servers should be straightforward:
    “Is everything o.k.? “Can I get something?”